Siberian tiger that terrified Vladivostok gets new wild home


Siberian tiger that terrified Vladivostok gets new wild home
  1. Siberian tiger that terrified Vladivostok gets new wild home
    o.seattletimes.com
    MOSCOW (AP) — A Siberian tiger that terrorized Russia’s Far East city of Vladivostok by prowling its suburbs has been relocated to a vast, wild Russian national park where officials hope he will thrive. The tiger, nicknamed Vladik, was captured last October on the edge of Vladivostok. He was helicoptered Monday to Bikin National Park, […
    Science

MOSCOW (AP) — A Siberian tiger that terrorized Russia’s Far East city of Vladivostok by prowling its suburbs has been relocated to a vast, wild Russian national park where officials hope he will thrive.

The tiger, nicknamed Vladik, was captured last October on the edge of Vladivostok. He was helicoptered Monday to Bikin National Park, 500 kilometers (350 miles) further north.

Russia has declared Siberian, or Amur, tigers a protected species. Only about 54 are estimated to live in the wild.

World Wildlife Fund video shows the tiger appearing initially bewildered when his cage was o…

  1. Advocates: Federal role crucial for iconic waterway cleanups

    Chippewa.com - Science
    05.24 / 05:55 chippewa.com
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) -- The Trump administration makes a straightforward case for slashing $427 million in federal spending to heal ailing regional water bodies such as the Great Lakes, Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound: State and local governments should do the work and foot the…
  2. Song diversity hints at thrushes' evolutionary past

    Phys.org -Science news
    05.24 / 04:51 phys.org
    The Hermit Thrush is famous for its melodiously undulating song, but we know very little about whether—and if so, how—its songs vary across the large swath of North America that it calls home in the summer. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances provides the first thorough overview of geographic variation in Hermit Thrush song structure and hints at how isolation and adaptation shape differences in the tunes of a learned song within a spe…
  3. Stop Wasting Energy on Negative Thoughts

    Humansarefree.com - Science
    05.24 / 04:41 humansarefree.com
    Wandering ThoughtsOur minds get side tracked so easily. One small thought can take us on a journey into the past or into the future. It is hard for the mind to stay in the moment, the now. The mind elaborates, embellishes, exaggerates, distorts, assumes and can take us away from the truth of a situation. It can invent all sorts of stories and mischief around quite harmless incidents that on reflection have a perfectly logical explanation.Read Entire Article…
  4. 2018 White House Budget Plan Slashes Funding for Safety-Net Programs

    Philanthropynewsdigest.org - Science
    The $4.094 trillion plan seeks to balance the budget over the next decade by slashing more than $1 trillion in spending for safety-net…
  5. Sobrato Family Foundation Invests $29 Million in Literacy Model

    Philanthropynewsdigest.org - Science
    The new investment will be used to expand the Sobrato Early Academic Language educational model across the…
  6. UNC-Chapel Hill Receives $18 Million for Entrepreneurship Program

    Philanthropynewsdigest.org - Science
    The gift from the Shuford Family will help the university meet increased student interest in business and entrepreneurship…
  7. H&M Foundation Commits $20.5 Million to Education, WASH, Women

    Philanthropynewsdigest.org - Science
    The three-year partnerships with UNICEF, WaterAid, and CARE will build on earlier efforts to boost access to education, clean water, and women's economic…
  8. DuPont Worker Sues Company for Retaliation Over Pesticide Concerns

    Beyondpesticides.org - Science
    05.24 / 04:39 beyondpesticides.org
    (Beyond Pesticides, May 24, 2017) A Hawai’i woman is suing her former employer, DuPont Pioneer, stating that the company retaliated against her for bringing up concerns over pesticide safety. Shanbnell Grilho, who worked for DuPont Pioneer on Oahu’s North Shore, alleges the company required her to apply hazardous herbicides without the proper training or protection, and ultimately fired her after fabricating allegations against her. This lawsuit is the latest claim against multinational pes…
  9. Antarctic: Irreversible ocean warming threatens the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf

    Skeptical-science.com - Science
    05.24 / 04:38 skeptical-science.com
    Skeptical Science Skeptical Science - Promoting Science and Critical Thinking Hartmut Hellmer, Frank Kauker, Ralph Timmermann, and Tore Hattermann Alfred of the Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, have published a new paper that focuses on the potential collapse of an Antarctic ice shelf. It is entitled “The Fate of the Southern Weddell Sea Continental Shelf in a Warming Climate“, […] Antarctic: Irreversible ocean …
  10. A fresh look inside the protein nano-machines

    Eurekalert.org - Biology
    05.24 / 04:19 eurekalert.org
    (Université de Genève) Proteins perform vital functions, they digest food and fight infections. They are in fact nano-machines, each one of them designed to perform a specific task. But how did they evolve to match those needs, how did the genes encode the structure and function of proteins? Researchers from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, the Institute for Basic Science, Korea, and the Rockefeller University, United States, have conducted a study that tackles this yet…
  11. Dartmouth-led study finds heavier precipitation in the northeast began in 1996

    Eurekalert.org - Biology
    05.24 / 04:19 eurekalert.org
    (Dartmouth College) Over the past century, the Northeast has experienced an increase in the number of storms with extreme precipitation. A Dartmouth-led study finds that the increase in extreme Northeast storms occurred as an abrupt shift in 1996, particularly in the spring and fall, rather than as a steady change over several decades. The findings were published in an early online release of the American Meteorological Society's 'Journal of…
  12. This Child Claims He Lived On Mars in Previous Incarnation and 'People Like Us Still Live There'

    Humansarefree.com - Science
    05.24 / 03:46 humansarefree.com
    A boy named Boris Kipriyanovich, or Boriska, lives in the town of Zhirinovsk of Russia’s Volgograd region. He was born on January 11, 1996. Since he was four he used to visit a well-known anomalous zone, commonly referred to as Medvedetskaya Gryada – a mountain near the town. It seems that the boy needed to visit the zone regularly to fulfill his needs in energy.Boriska’s parents, nice, educated and hospitable people, are worried about their son’s fascinating talents. They do not know how o…
  13. Brazil approves use of CBD medicine

    Theleafonline.com - Science
    05.24 / 03:31 theleafonline.com
    The Brazilian government has authorized doctors to prescribe HempMeds® Brasil’s hemp cannabidiol (CBD) oil product Real Scientific Hemp Oil™ (RSHO™) to treat patients there who suffer from Multiple Sclerosis. Nonmedical cannabis remains illegal in the country, but some medical use was approved back in 2015. However, no access has been available via prescription until now. It is the […] The post Brazil approves use of CBD medicine appeared first on The Leaf Online…
  14. Save Medicaid: Legalize medical marijuana

    Theleafonline.com - Science
    05.24 / 03:31 theleafonline.com
    Here’s something we haven’t heard from Trump’s camp in its promise to replace Obama Care with “something much better.” How about legal medical cannabis for all Americans? Legalizing medical marijuana federally could save taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars in medical expenses on the one hand, and a billion dollars on Medicaid subsidies, on the […] The post Save Medicaid: Legalize medical marijuana appeared first on The Leaf…
  15. Prediction of Conversion to Alzheimer’s Disease with Longitudinal Measures and Time-To-Event Data

    Content.iospress.com - Science
    05.24 / 02:45 content.iospress.com
    HOUSTON – Predicting the timing of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) conversion for individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be significantly improved by incorporating longitudinal change information of clinical and neuroimaging markers, in addition to baseline characteristics, according to projections made by investigators from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Hou…
  16. Dear Dance Teachers, Please Stop Sexualizing Your Child Students

    Humansarefree.com - Science
    05.24 / 02:42 humansarefree.com
    Dance Teachers,We need to talk. You have got to stop sending children out to dance in public in their underwear. Maybe you’ve added some rhinestones to that underwear or maybe you’ve strategically placed a piece of chiffon somewhere but come on…underwear is underwear and we all know it.And Dance Parents, you shouldn’t allow your children to do this, even if your Dance Teacher thinks its okay.Read Entire Article »…
  17. Death From Below: Invasive Lionfish Lurking in Deep Reefs, Sending Hungry Reinforcements to the Shallows

    Discovermagazine.com -Science
    05.24 / 01:59 discovermagazine.com
    In the last few decades, scientists have come to appreciate the incredible creatures living on the reefs that lie just below conventional diving limits in what is called the mesophotic zone. These incredible biodiversity hotspots are home to more endemic species than shallower reefs, and conservationists are hopeful they may serve as refuges—pockets of relatively pristine habitat out of reach of anthropogenic stressors—where species under threat from pollution, overfishing, and even the eff…
  18. Traumatic beetle sex causes rapid evolutionary arms race

    Newscientist.com - Science
    05.24 / 01:56 newscientist.com
    Male seed beetles use sharp spikes on their penises to damage females during sex, but females are evolving thicker tissue to resist…
  19. Cancer research, public health and worker safety would all see steep cuts under Trump budget

    LATimes-Science
    05.24 / 01:52 latimes.com
    Under the heading “Putting America’s Health First,” the Trump administration’s 2018 budget blueprint includes a $5.8-billion cut for the National Institutes of Health, a move that would slash the medical research agency’s funding by just over 18%. It would reduce public health spending by the U.S…
  20. Gender studies journal hoax reveals you can publish utter nonsense

    Doubtfulnews.com - Science
    05.24 / 01:47 doubtfulnews.com
    A pair of skeptical scholars pulled off a hoax publication (in, dare I say it, a “dick” move) to expose problems with the field of gender studies and, ultimately, the peer review and publishing process for scholarly journals. Peter Boghossian and James Lindsay wrote “3,000 words of utter nonsense posing as academic scholarship” and had…