Let Hillary Clinton roar


Let Hillary Clinton roar
  1. Let Hillary Clinton roar
    gantdaily.com
    Something very strange is going on in post-mortems about the 2016 election. On the one hand, the hard evidence is piling up that a combination of factors largely outside of Hillary Clinton’s control were responsible for her loss to Donald Trump. On the other hand, many apparently don’t want Hillary Clinton to talk about any…
    Pennsylvania (PA)

Something very strange is going on in post-mortems about the 2016 election. On the one hand, the hard evidence is piling up that a combination of factors largely outside of Hillary Clinton’s control were responsible for her loss to Donald Trump. On the other hand, many apparently don’t want Hillary Clinton to talk about any of that.

Every day, we hear fresh reports of the extent and insidious nature of Russian interference in the promotion of fake news stories and nasty accusations about Hillary Clinton’s character — a smear campaign that was bound to have had an effect on voters’ perceptions (why else would the Russians invest so much energy and money?). But when Clinton mentions the Russians, she’s accused of shuffling responsibility away from herself.

Studies by respected think tanks such as Harvard’s Shorenstein Center have documented a negative bias against Clinton in ordinary news reporting. This was not “fake news” but a daily, repetitive media buzz of (often GOP-inspired) “scandals” and “suspect” activity, which always had Clinton hiding something, from her basement server to her pneumonia. And this obscured coverage of her policy speeches and core messages.

But she dare not talk about that, lest she be seen as boo-hooing about unfair treatment by the press.

Pollster Nate Silver has published data highly suggestive of the disastrous effect of James Comey’s eleventh-hour revival of the media’s email obsession — an announcement made just as Donald Trump’s post-“Access Hollywood” polling numbers plummeted and Clinton’s momentum revived. But when Clinton mentions Comey, it is taken as just one more complaint in a litany of “blaming others” for her own mistakes.

Instead we’re told — and what we’re told Clinton herself refuses to acknowledge — that the real problem was Clinton herself. It’s usually a one-dimensional narrative. She didn’t reach the “working people.” She had no “economic message.” She was too “establishment” in a year when people wanted change. She didn’t go to the right states during the last week of the election.

And, of course, the old go-to: she just wasn’t likeable enough. (Let us pause to recall here, that Hillary Clinton won the popular vote over Donald Trump by 2,864,974 votes.)

And now, because she’s published a book in which she has the audacity to present her own multi-dimensional account of the election, she’s being advised, by colleagues as well as pundits, that she should stop “re-litigating” the past, and that it’s time to “move on.”

Interesting that no one criticized the authors for “looking backward” when “Shattered,” a book that puts the blame squarely on Clinton and her campaign, was published. Or when Bernie Sanders, who now suggests “it’s a little bit silly” to talk about the election, published his own diagnosis a week after the election. Yet on Sunday, Susan Chira, in The New York Times, called Hillary Clinton “the woman who won’t go away,” and as I write this, the day after publication of Clinton’s new book “What Happened,” the annoyed, often vicious customer reviews are piling up on Amazon.

Why are people so angry with Clinton for having the chutzpah to tell her story? Gender certainly plays a role — but words like “misogyny” and “sexism” require much more precise analysis than I can provide here (I get into it in my book), and without that precision are dull weapons that shut down people’s brains.

So let’s put those in the background, as atmospheric elements that conditioned virtually everything that happened — including the daily drumbeat of media mantras: “untrustworthy Hillary,” “unpopular Hillary,” “evasive Hillary,” Hillary who couldn’t command the crowds of a Sanders or a Trump, who didn’t know how to “reach people.”

And let’s also acknowledge that the 2016 election wasn’t the first time that Hillary Clinton, who has been a national presence since the early 90’s, has drawn fire from the mass media.

But at the same time, there have also been broad periods in her recent political career — strikingly, when she was elected (twice) to serve as a US senator from New York, and then appointed Secretary of State — when her approval ratings were dazzlingly high. At that time the first lady who had the temerity to request an office in the West Wing while she tried to garner support for universal health care was forgotten — a dim historical reference to a new generation of voters.

Indeed, in 2014, a year before she announced her intention to run for president, a Times/CBS News poll reported that 82% of Democrats favored her over either Joe Biden or Elizabeth Warren, and John McCain told CNN that “if the election were held tomorrow, Hillary Clinton would most likely be the President.”

Then Hillary announced, and the attacks began — attacks that introduced Hillary for the first time to generations that knew little about either her past achievements or the backlash that her feminism and progressivism had elicited.

Moreover, with political opponents far more unscrupulous than ever before in exploiting the…

  1. A Tale Of Two States: How California And Texas May Fare Under GOP Health Plan

    Wesa.fm - Pittsburgh
    09.22 / 03:13 wesa.fm
    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit AILSA CHANG, HOST: The Senate is taking one more stab at repealing the Affordable Care Act. Republicans say they'll vote on what's known as the Graham-Cassidy bill next week. Among other things, it would dramatically redistribute federal funds to states. And generally, states that expanded Medicaid stand to lose billions of dollars. The rest would see a short-term influx of funds. We're going to hear from one of those states, Texas, in a minute.…
  2. Aaron Hernandez's Brain Reveals Signs Of CTE, Says Lawyer

    Wesa.fm - Pittsburgh
    09.22 / 03:13 wesa.fm
    The brain of former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez showed severe signs of the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, referred to as CTE, according to doctors who conducted tests after he committed suicide in April while imprisoned for murder. "We're told it was the most severe case they had ever seen of someone of Aaron's age," said Hernandez's attorney, Jose Baez, in a news conference announcing the filing of a lawsuit against the National Football League…
  3. Kim Jong Un Issues Statement on Trump: 'A Frightened Dog Barks Louder'

    Wesa.fm - Pittsburgh
    09.22 / 03:13 wesa.fm
    North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un has weighed in on the heightened tensions on the Korean peninsula, with a personal analysis of President Trump's Wednesday speech at the United Nation General Assembly . Trump's speech, which was notable for its apocalyptic rhetoric — it vowed to "totally destroy" North Korea and its 25 million people if the United States had to defend itself and its allies — aroused greater fears of military miscalculation that could lead to catastrophe. Kim, in a lengthy …
  4. Police: Crash claims life of 13-year-old Dover student

    Ydr.com - York
    09.22 / 03:11 ydr.com
    A fatal crash involving a pedestrian claimed the life of a 13-year-old Dover Intermediate School…
  5. One Woman Shares How She Was Drawn Into A Gang At An Early Age

    Wdiy.org - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 03:08 wdiy.org
    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit AILSA CHANG, HOST: In Chicago, where gangs drive much of the city's gun violence, discussion often centers on why boys join gangs and pick up guns. But what about the girls? We've been hearing stories this week from a series called Every Other Hour. It's from member station WBEZ in Chicago. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Today we'll hear why girls join gangs. Experts say girls and women are usually shown as little more than hangers-on to the boys and men, but…
  6. Florida's Citrus Groves Hit Hard By Hurricane Irma

    Wdiy.org - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 03:08 wdiy.org
    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Hurricane Irma, which tore through the Caribbean and across Florida earlier this month, complicated life for a lot of people, including Florida citrus growers. Ellis Hunt Jr.'s family has been in the Florida citrus business for almost 100 years. He has 5,000 acres of citrus trees, and a lot of these trees were badly damaged. I talked to Hunt today. And before I did, I looked at pictures he'd shared with us of trees bent sideways…
  7. A Tale Of Two States: How California And Texas May Fare Under GOP Health Plan

    Wdiy.org - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 03:08 wdiy.org
    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit AILSA CHANG, HOST: The Senate is taking one more stab at repealing the Affordable Care Act. Republicans say they'll vote on what's known as the Graham-Cassidy bill next week. Among other things, it would dramatically redistribute federal funds to states. And generally, states that expanded Medicaid stand to lose billions of dollars. The rest would see a short-term influx of funds. We're going to hear from one of those states, Texas, in a minute.…
  8. Ex-CIA operative apologizes for tweet of anti-Semitic article

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 02:45 gantdaily.com
    Former CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilson is apologizing after tweeting an anti-Semitic article titled “America’s Jews Are Driving America’s Wars” on Thursday. Wilson has been critical of President Donald Trump and his use of Twitter — including a recent effort on GoFundMe to buy a stake of Twitter and convince the company to ban the…
  9. North Korea could test hydrogen bomb in Pacific, says foreign minister

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 02:45 gantdaily.com
    North Korea’s foreign minister hinted Thursday that Pyongyang could test a powerful nuclear weapon over the Pacific Ocean in response to US President Donald Trump’s threats of military action. The country’s Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho, who was due to address the United Nations General Assembly on Friday but has since dropped out, told reporters…
  10. North Korea could test hydrogen bomb in Pacific Ocean, says foreign minister

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 02:45 gantdaily.com
    North Korea’s foreign minister hinted Thursday that Pyongyang could test a powerful nuclear weapon in the Pacific Ocean in response to US President Donald Trump’s threats of military action. The country’s Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho, who was due to address the United Nations General Assembly on Friday but has since dropped out, told reporters…
  11. 34 hours of tragedy at a Mexican school: listening as hope is raised and then fades

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 02:45 gantdaily.com
    “Silencio!” The shout comes, then as far as one can see, fists are raised in the air. Hope, at rescue scenes across the country, is measured in silence. Twenty-two hours after the 7.1 quake crashed through central Mexico, the sounds of a thousand people speaking, heavy machinery moving, and tractors dumping debris all come to…
  12. Puerto Rico cleans up as Turks and Caicos brace for Hurricane Maria

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 02:45 gantdaily.com
    The large eye of Hurricane Maria lumbered toward the popular vacation islands of Turks and Caicos and the Bahamas on Thursday, leaving Puerto Rico and its Caribbean neighbors battered, drenched and largely without power. The core of Maria, a major hurricane, is forecast to pass just east of the Turks and Caicos and southeastern Bahamas…
  13. U.S. beefs up sanctions on North Korea

    Sharonherald.com - Local
    09.22 / 02:39 www.sharonherald.com
    NEW YORK – President Donald Trump added economic action to his fiery military threats against North Korea on Thursday, authorizing stiffer new sanctions in response to the Koreans’ nuclear weapons advances. Its leader Kim Jong Un issued a rare sta…
  14. Northampton County plans to examine issues with home rule charter

    Mcall.com - Local
    09.22 / 02:39 www.mcall.com
    Northampton County Council scrapped plans for a voter referendum on term limits Thursday night in favor of a broader look at its home rule charter.The charter acts as the county’s constitution, defining the shape of the government structure and the responsibilities of each elected position. S…
  15. Second chance offered to those wanted in Dauphin County

    Abc27.com-PA
    09.22 / 02:38 www.abc27.com
    Dauphin County's Safe Return program kicked off Thursday at the Zion Assembly of…
  16. Teachers in Dallas School District Plan to Strike

    Wnep.com-PA
    09.22 / 02:38 wnep.com
    DALLAS — Teachers in the Dallas School District will begin to strike on Friday, September 22nd. Tensions are running high in the Dallas School District. Once again, teachers are going on strike. “They make better money than I do and a lot of other people do, and when they retire, boy, they have it made,” Irene Whitlock of Trucksville said. “I don’t want to take away from them but we can’t take away from the children just so that they can have […
  17. Peeking into the past: Claims for flood relief victims denied

    Psdispatch.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 02:02 psdispatch.com
    Editor’s note: This column first appeared in the Sunday Dispatch in September 2011. Question #1 An article In the Duryea section of the Sept. 25, 1956 issue of the Sunday Dispatch noted that in 1892, Duryea was known by what other name? 1956 – 61 YEARS AGO Pittston City Police Chief O’Brien had a gang…
  18. Democratic senators preparing bill to deal with online political advertising

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 01:46 gantdaily.com
    Amid growing concern over Facebook’s sale of political ads to Russians, Democratic Senators Amy Klobuchar and Mark Warner have formally called for new legislation to enhance the transparency of online political advertisements, CNN has learned. Klobuchar and Warner sent a letter to their colleagues on Thursday inviting them to co-sponsor legislation that would among other…
  19. How unmarried Americans are changing everything

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 01:46 gantdaily.com
    It wasn’t long ago that being single after a certain age was considered a recipe for lifelong misery. Up until 1970, the average woman married before she was legally old enough to have a drink at her wedding, and the average man married at 23. A woman still single at the ripe old age of…
  20. Obituary Notice: Robert A. Hanna Sr.

    Gantdaily.com - Pennsylvania (PA)
    09.22 / 01:46 gantdaily.com
    Robert A. Hanna Sr., 75, of Houtzdale died Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017 at Ridgeview Eldercare, Curwensville. Born Oct. 31, 1941 in Akron, NY, he was the son of the late James and Mabel (Webster) Hanna. On Sept. 1, 1971, he married Kathryn C (Rowles) Hanna, who preceded him in death Aug. 29, 2015. He was…