Latest news from Nationalinterest.org - Politics feed

Latest news from Nationalinterest.org - Politics feed

  1. A New Cold War in the Indian Ocean?

    06.19 / 17:44 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Bertil Lintner Security, Asia Strategic ripples are gathering. A new Cold War is brewing in the Indian Ocean, with an informal alliance of the United States, India, Australia, Japan on one side and China on the other. While tensions in the ocean are not yet as pitched as in the hotly contested South China Sea, the potential for conflict is unmistakably rising in the high stakes strategic theater. More than 60% of the world’s oil shipments pass through the Indian Ocean, largely from the M…
  2. South Korea Has a New Weapon System to Defend Itself Against North Korea’s Missiles

    06.19 / 17:44 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Ryan Pickrell Security, Asia South Korea announced Sunday that the Cheolmae-2, a medium-range surface-to-air missile (M-SAM) is ready for mass production.  South Korea has a new weapon system to defend itself against North Korea’s growing arsenal of ballistic missiles. South Korea announced Sunday that the Cheolmae-2, a medium-range surface-to-air missile (M-SAM) is ready for mass production. In a recent test, the hit-to-kill missile interceptor system brought down all five mock ba…
  3. Watch a Special Forces Soldier Run Into A Hail Of ISIS Gunfire To Save Young Girl

    06.19 / 17:44 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Russ Read Security, David Eubank, a 10-year veteran of the Army Special Forces, abandoned caution to save the young girl by running into an open area in the middle of war-torn Mosul.  A former special forces soldier and current aid worker risked his life after running into a hail of gunfire to save a young Iraqi girl from ISIS snipers. David Eubank, a 10-year veteran of the Army Special Forces, abandoned caution to save the young girl by running into an open area in the middle of …
  4. 5 Weapons Russia Would Not Want to Face in a War with America

    06.19 / 15:49 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Zachary Keck Security, Or in Syria.  The allies’ own military capabilities also pose a threat to Russia. With some exceptions like China, India and Brazil, most of the top military spenders in the world are U.S. allies. Although the United States frequently (and justifiably) chides NATO members for not spending enough on defense, even without the United States, NATO still spends about three times as much on defense each year as Russia does. Indeed, any combination of Germany, France an…
  5. These are the 5 Most Fearsome Russian Weapons of War America Should Fear

    06.19 / 15:49 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dave Majumdar Security, Should Washington be worried?  As an air-superiority fighter, the Su-35’s major advantages are its combination of high altitude capability and blistering speed—which allow the fighter to impart the maximum possible amount of launch energy to its arsenal of long-range air-to-air missiles. During an air battle, the Su-35 would launch its missiles from high supersonic speeds around Mach 1.5 at altitudes greater than 45,000 ft. It also has three-dimensional thrust ve…
  6. Iran’s Missile Attack On ISIS Was Coordinated With Assad, Went Through Iraqi Airspace

    06.19 / 15:49 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Russ Read Security, Middle East The plot thickens. An Iranian official admitted that Sunday’s strike against the Islamic State was coordinated with the Syrian government and that the missiles used traveled through Iraqi airspace. “The firing of these missiles had previously been coordinated with Syria an the missiles entered Syrian airspace through Iraq,” Gen. Ramezan Sharif, head of Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) public relations told Tasnim News, an Iranian gover…
  7. The Su-22: Syria’s War-Weary Warhorse the U.S. Navy Just Took Out

    06.19 / 15:49 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Tom Cooper Security, Syria Everything you need to know.  The Sukhoi Design Bureau forged a reputation for big and powerful fighter-bombers. Today, the Russian company primarily builds different variants of the Su-27. Almost unnoticed, a dwindling number of much older Sukhoi Su-22s remain in service. In Syria, together with much more powerful Su-24s, they form the backbone of an embattled air force. Often overlooked, the Sukhoi Su-20/22 family was not only widely exported by the former …
  8. Downed Syrian Fighter was Pentagon’s First Air-To-Air Kill In 18 Years

    06.19 / 14:52 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Saagar Enjeti Security, And Russia was not happy about it.  The U.S. military scored its first air-to-air kill in 18 years Sunday when a Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet obliterated a Syrian regime Su-22. The last U.S. air-to-air kill was in 1999 during American participation in NATO Operation Allied Force over Yugoslavia when Lt. Col. Michael H. Geczy downed a Soviet-era MIG-29 with an F-16CJ. The shoot-down comes during a period of heightened tensions between the U.S., Iran, Russia and the …
  9. Is it Time for Australia to Buy Nuclear Submarines?

    06.19 / 14:52 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Geoffrey Barker Security, Asia Could this deter China?  Australia’s decision to spend $50 billion on 12 French diesel-electric Shortfin Barracuda submarines reflects a long-established government preference for non-nuclear submarine forces. But will this preference remain strategically credible in future years if our strategic circumstances continue to deteriorate and if potential competitors continue to expand and to modernize their submarine fleets? Australia’s new submarines are a con…
  10. U.S. Navy Sailor Tried To Save His Shipmates As Damaged Destroyer Filled With Water

    06.19 / 14:52 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Ryan Pickrell Security, Asia The USS Fitzgerald’s captain, Cmdr. Bryce Benson, was, along with two other crew members, airlifted to a the U.S. Naval Hospital in Yokosuka, Japan. U.S. sailors aboard a Navy destroyer demonstrated bravery and heroism when their vessel was struck by a container ship in the middle of the night Saturday. The ACX Crystal, a massive Philippine-flagged merchant ship, collided with the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald off the Izu Pen…
  11. Watch as a Russian Fighter Jet Intercepts U.S. Bombers Over Baltic Sea During NATO Exercise

    06.19 / 11:51 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Nolan Peterson Security, Europe Could things escalate?  KRZESINY AIR BASE, Poland—A Russian fighter jet last week intercepted a formation of 11 NATO aircraft, including U.S. bombers, as they flew within international airspace over the Baltic Sea as part of a military exercise. This correspondent for The Daily Signal was onboard a U.S. Air Force KC-135 aerial refueling tanker, part of the formation June 9, and witnessed the intercept by the Russian Su-27 fighter jet. “It’s a game,” Air Fo…
  12. The U.S. Army Wants a More Powerful Rifle

    06.19 / 11:51 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Matthew Moss Security, 5.56-millimeter ain't cutting it any more. On May 30, 2017, the U.S. Army officially asked industry for information on a new 7.62-by-51-millimeter rifle. The request signals the Army’s intention to begin moving away from the 5.56-by-45-millimeter M-16 and M-4 that have been the ground-combat branch’s main firearms for generations. The Army’s RFI comes hot on the heels of the U.S. Marine Corps’ own RFI for a new off-the-shelf infantry rifle. But the Army’s so-calle…
  13. How the U.S. Navy Plans to Keep Its Edge Underwater Edge

    06.19 / 00:51 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dave Majumdar Security, UUVs are all the rage. And thanks to Boeing and Huntington Ingalls, the U.S. Navy could soon tap into this important technology.  As the United States Navy scrambles to bolster its dwindling attack submarine fleet, the service will have to rely more on unmanned underwater vehicles. Boeing and Huntington Ingalls Industries are working on one such option for the Navy. The two companies are teaming up to design and produce an Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (UUVs) for th…
  14. All the Terrifying Ways ISIS Is Dangerous (Hint: Others Will Use Their Tactics)

    06.19 / 00:51 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dave Majumdar Security, The Pentagon does not yet have a cost effective way to counter such systems. Almost inevitably, the cost-exchange ratio favors the enemy. U.S. and allied forces operating in the Middle East and around the globe are increasingly facing off against advanced systems such as drones, airborne improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other weapons that are being built by insurgent and terrorist groups. But the Pentagon does not yet have a cost effective way to counter…
  15. Blocpolitik

    06.19 / 00:51 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Michael Lind Global Governance, Americas What the U.S. foreign-policy elite and its allies abroad call the liberal world order is nothing more than the contemporary American bloc, like the “Free World” of the Cold War. IF RIP VAN WINKLE had gone to sleep in 1992 and awakened in 2017, he might have been astounded by many things, including smart phones and President Donald Trump. He might also have been astonished at how little has changed in the deep structure of world politics since the …
  16. Germany's Right-Wing Crusaders

    06.19 / 00:51 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Thomas Meaney Politics, Europe There’s more than meets the eye to the upstart Alternative für Deutschland—and it’s not going away. IN STUTTGART I was awoken by a large man outside my hotel window wearing a niqab. “I am the protest for the AfD / and that is totally ok!” went the hoarse refrain. It was the annual convention for the Alternative für Deutschland, Germany’s no longer fledgling far-right party. More than four thousand of the faithful had converged in Stuttgart to make it the la…
  17. The Volatile Oil Market Is Bigger than Just the Middle East

    06.19 / 00:51 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Gregory Brew Economics, Middle East In the past, risk measurably increased when things got tense near the oil fields of the Middle East. Today, the world’s energy supply and consumption patterns are more complex. On Friday April 7, a day after the U.S. missile strike against Syria, the global oil price did something it hadn’t done in months: it shot way, way up. By Monday morning, the West Texas Index, one of two major global benchmarks, had gone up by $2 to $53 per barrel, the biggest p…
  18. The U.S. Air Force Wanted a 'Parasite' Fighter

    06.18 / 14:12 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    David Axe Security, Bombers shouldn't try to carry their own fighter escorts. Yes, the title stinks. But I love — love — Steve Pace’s The Big Book of X-Bombers and X-Fighters, out now from Zenith Press. “It takes a brave author to write a comprehensive review of every turbojet-powered Air Force fighter and bomber, produced or not,” Walter Boyne, himself a famous author and pilot, writes in the foreword of Pace’s thick, lavish tome. I couldn’t agree more. X-Bombers and X-Fighters is too …
  19. The U.S. Air Force Is Starving Its A-10 Squadrons—Again

    06.18 / 14:12 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dan Grazier, Mandy Smithberger Security, Flying branch continues to cut the Warthog fleet, ignoring Congressional requirements. Since February 2016 the U.S. Air Force has been trumpeting that it has ended—or at least paused—its extended campaign against the A-10 and the close air support mission. “As a mission, we’re fully committed to close air support,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Dave Goldfein assured reporters at a press conference. But as first reported by Travis Tritten at the W…
  20. The F-108 Could Have Been America's Mach 3 Cold War Super-Interceptor

    06.18 / 14:12 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Michael Peck Security, America Washington feared Russian bombers. This was the answer to stopping them. Fearing an onslaught of Soviet bombers during the 1950s, the U.S. Air Force was intent on developing supersonic interceptors to stop them. Had they come to fruition, these high-altitude Mach 3 interceptors would have left today’s fighters in the dust. In response to a 1949 Air Force request for a supersonic interceptor, Republic Aviation proposed in 1951 the XF-103, a ramjet f…