Latest news from Nationalinterest.org - Politics feed

Latest news from Nationalinterest.org - Politics feed

  1. The U.S. Military's Most Dangerous Enemy (and It's Not Russia or China)

    08.23 / 20:21 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Task and Purpose, Carl Forsling Security, Toxic leadership is a critical threat. Recently, the term “toxic leadership” has broken into mainstream culture. Where it used to mainly occupy wardrooms, ready rooms, and professional journals, it’s now entered the lexicon of pop psychology and management consultants. The military, to its credit, has devoted much time and energy to the study of leadership, probably much more than the civilian world. It has been trying to address the toxic leade…
  2. What Really Won World War II (and It Wasn't Nuclear Weapons)

    08.23 / 20:21 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Warfare History Network History, Europe “We won because we smothered the enemy in an avalanche of production, the like of which he had never seen, nor dreamed possible.” “We won because we smothered the enemy in an avalanche of production, the like of which he had never seen, nor dreamed possible.” The above quote is attributed to William Knudsen, president of General Motors and Roosevelt’s wartime director of production management, a man who was intimately involved in the massive produc…
  3. The Secret Way China and Russia Would Crush America in a War

    08.23 / 16:26 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dave Majumdar Security, What can Washington do to stop it?  China is on the verge of fielding an operational anti-satellite weapon. Meanwhile, both great powers are working on developing directed energy weapons to counter American satellites. “Ten years after China intercepted one of its own satellites in low-Earth orbit, its ground-launched ASAT missiles might be nearing operational service within the PLA [People’s Liberation Army],” Coats stated. “Both countries are advancing directed…
  4. Why Super Massive Armies Are Back

    08.23 / 15:25 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Jyri Raitasalo Security, Europe Small professional forces are not well equipped to deal with the rising tide of large-scale military risks and threats that are not only on the horizon but are already here. During the last 20 years, western militaries have followed a transformational agenda. Ever since the early 1990s, military “overweight” has been shed as direct military threats to western security and strategic interests evaporated. During the post-Cold War era, and relying on the so-…
  5. The Problem with America's Nuclear Weapons: They're Really Old

    08.23 / 15:25 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Sandra Erwin Security, Asia And expensive to upgrade. Donald Trump recently reminded the world that his “first order as president was to renovate and modernize our nuclear arsenal.” And he tweeted: “Hopefully we will never have to use this power, but there will never be a time that we are not the most powerful nation in the world!” The president’s hot rhetoric, alas, is about to collide with the cold fiscal and political realities of nuclear weapons modernization. The U.S. Air Force this…
  6. How the French Navy 'Went to War' with America and 'Sunk' an Aircraft Carrier

    08.23 / 14:26 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Kyle Mizokami Security, Yes, this happenned.  Saphir is the second of six Rubis-class nuclear attack submarines built for the French Navy. Rubis is the first generation of French nuclear attack submarines—while the French Navy has had nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines since the mid-60s, French attack submarines were conventionally powered until the early 1980s. At 2,630 tons submerged and 241 feet long the Rubis class may also be the smallest nuclear combatants ever put to se…
  7. Could Russia or China 'Sink' America's New Aircraft Carriers?

    08.23 / 12:21 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Robert Farley Security, And are they just obsolete?  The United States has decided to spend many billions of dollars on the CVN-78 (“Ford”) class of aircraft carriers to replace the venerable Nimitz class. The latter has served the U.S. Navy since 1975, with the last ship (USS George H. W.  Bush) entering service in 2009. The Fords could be in service, in one configuration or another, until the end of the 21st century. Just as the U.S. government has determined to make this investment, …
  8. U.S. Navy Finishing Design for New Guided Missile Destroyers

    08.23 / 11:21 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Kris Osborn Security, And why China and Russia should worry.  DDG 51 Flight III destroyers are expected to expand upon a promising new ship-based weapons system technology fire-control system, called Naval Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air, or NIFC-CA. The technology, which has already been deployed, enables ship-based radar to connect with an airborne sensor platform to detect approaching enemy anti-ship cruise missiles from beyond the horizon and, if needed, launch an SM-6 miss…
  9. Report: Multiple Countries Interested in Buying Russia's New MiG-35 Fighter Jet

    08.23 / 02:36 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dave Majumdar Security, But the aircraft is a far cry from the advanced version offered to India in 2011. Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG (RSK-MiG) hopes to sell its new MiG-35 Fulcrum-F fighter to Peru, Myanmar and Bangladesh. Negotiations are apparently already underway. While the MiG-35 will eventually enter service with the Russian Aerospace Forces, the new Fulcrum derivative is aimed at the low-end of the fighter market. "We plan to discuss deliveries of MiG-35 planes,” MiG chief …
  10. Russia's PAK-DP Interceptor: The Unmanned Plane that Could Replace the MiG-31?

    08.23 / 02:36 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dave Majumdar Security, Maybe.  Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG expects that it will likely develop an unmanned version of its forthcoming PAK-DP replacement for the Mikoyan MiG-31 interceptor in the future. However, there are questions as to if the PAK-DP will ever materialize or if it will continue to remain an aspiration. Indeed, it is not clear if MiG—known during the Soviet-era as the Mikoyan Gurevich design bureau—will survive as an independent unit within Russia’s United Aircra…
  11. Why the Russian Navy Is a More Capable Adversary Than It Appears

    08.22 / 22:32 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Michael Kofman, Jeffrey Edmonds Security, Europe The oft-unacknowledged truth is that the Russian Navy is a lot more operational now than it has been in many years. Russia still depends on the remnants of a blue-water navy inherited from the Soviet Union, but a new force is slowly rising to take its place both above and beneath the waves. This navy will be different, with a strategy of its own. The United States should not fear the Russian Navy, but it should respect and study what…
  12. How Kim Jong-un Saved the World from North Korea

    08.22 / 22:32 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Sergey Radchenko, Campbell Craig Security, Asia Kim Jong-un gains security and stability by threatening to use his new ICBM, but he loses everything if he actually uses it. Pyongyang’s successful test of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) got the world talking. If and when—with the emphasis on when—the North Koreans develop the capability to couple their more and more powerful missiles with nuclear warheads, Kim Jong-un will be in a position to launch a nuclear strike against th…
  13. Russia's Unmanned Systems Are on the Move

    08.22 / 22:32 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Samuel Bendett Security, Europe The Kalashnikov family of companies that now includes the makers of drones and boats, besides the famed namesake semiautomatic weapon. The Kalashnikov family of companies that now includes the makers of drones and boats, besides the famed namesake semiautomatic weapon, is getting to ready to present a heavy combat unmanned ground vehicle, according to the official press release via TASS news agency: “(We) will present, within the current year, a r…
  14. These Vehicles Are What Make the U.S. Army a Deadly Fighting Force

    08.22 / 20:26 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Dan Goure Security, Fleets of tanks, infantry fighting vehicles, armored personnel carriers and more keep the army fighting. The U.S. Army possesses many vehicles. There are fleets of main battle tanks, infantry fighting vehicles, armored personnel carriers, engineering support vehicles, mobile artillery, mine-protected vehicles, prime movers and trucks, light tactical vehicles and light utility vehicles. They range in size and weight from the 70-plus ton Abrams main battle tank to the…
  15. Don't Count Japan out in the North Korea Crisis

    08.22 / 20:26 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Grant Newsham Security, Asia Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has helped shift the national psychology about regional risk and defense. Not many years ago in Japan, the Korean peninsula and North Korea were considered America’s problem and even America’s fault. The routinely heard complaint was the US military presence might drag Japan into America’s wars. The complaint is heard a lot less these days. North Korean missiles — someday to be nuclear tipped — overflying Japan or landing in its terr…
  16. Afghanistan: Trump Is Playing the Bush-Obama Game

    08.22 / 17:31 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    William Wechsler Security, Asia While Trump’s rhetoric suggested a sharp break from his predecessor’s approach, the basic parameters of U.S. policy will remain largely consistent. Last night Donald J. Trump became the third consecutive U.S. president to ensure that his successor will also need to wage war in Afghanistan. This is justifiably frustrating to the American public, but unfortunately appropriate to the threats at hand. As each of his predecessors previously concluded, often to …
  17. Trump Wants You to Write Him a Blank Check for War in Afghanistan. Don't.

    08.22 / 17:31 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Daniel L. Davis Security, Middle East Candidate Trump’s instincts were right. It is time to end the mission in Afghanistan with a plan that actually safeguards U.S. interests. On Monday night from Fort Myer, Virginia, President Trump told the nation that despite what he’d said from the campaign trail in 2016, he was not going to end the war in Afghanistan. Instead, he would expand it and remove any visible exit signs from the equation. Whether this decision will cost him politically in 2…
  18. U.S. Military Helicopters Will Soon Be Able to Blast Missiles out of the Sky

    08.22 / 15:28 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Kris Osborn Security, BAE is helping America keep up with shoulder-fired threats. BAE Systems is working to address an Army need by testing an emerging helicopter protection technology able to detect, distinguish and destroy approaching enemy fire in a more effective and integrated fashion than existing systems can, industry developers explained. As a way to respond to and anticipate evolving Army requirements, BAE is engineering and testing a 3-Dimensional Advanced Warning System, or…
  19. An Underwater War May Be Brewing in the Asia-Pacific

    08.22 / 15:28 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    Graeme Dunk Security, Asia When half the world's submarines will be so close together, how can we tell friend from foe? The 2016 Defence White Paper, the Naval Shipbuilding Plan, and associated statements by political figures such as Prime Minister Turnbull and Defence Industry Minister Pyne have all advocated the need for enhanced anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The impetus for this mooted rediscovery of ASW is the understanding that by…
  20. A True Afghanistan Counterinsurgency Is Trump's Only Hope

    08.22 / 15:28 nationalinterest.org Nationalinterest.org - Politics
    John Nagl Security, Asia I urge Trump to go to Afghanistan immediately—this week—to meet with his commanders and diplomats. Last night, Donald Trump became the third consecutive U.S. president to commit to a counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan. He did not do so willingly; indeed, like President George W. Bush, Donald Trump had campaigned explicitly on the idea of abandoning nation-building campaigns like those conducted by his predecessor. But there are only three options when you…