Latest news from Newsy.com - Science feed

Latest news from Newsy.com - Science feed

  1. Aaron Hernandez Had CTE, And His Family Is Taking Action

    09.22 / 02:53 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoAaron Hernandez's fiancee is suing the NFL after an autopsy found Hernandez, the former football star who committed suicide while serving a life sentence for murder, had a degenerative brain disease associated with playing football.An examination from researchers at Boston University found Hernandez had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.  CTE is a rare brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head. It's been linked to playing football. A study…
  2. As Wildfires Get Worse, USDA Says Firefighters Need More Funding

    09.22 / 01:02 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoFighting forest fires has gotten expensive. Wildfire suppression has cost the U.S. Forest Service $2 billion so far this fiscal year.That's why U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue called on Congress to change the way wildfire suppression is funded. And he's enlisting state foresters' help.Perdue said, "Write a note to your Congressional delegation saying, 'Please support the permanent fire funding fix so the U.S. Forest Service can manage its forests…
  3. One Of The Last Paris Climate Accord Holdouts Just Agreed To Sign

    09.21 / 20:11 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoNicaragua plans to sign the Paris climate agreement — which makes the U.S. and Syria the only two countries not fully on board.According to local media, Nicaragua initially refused to join because it thought enforcement of the accord wasn't strong enough and that it "was not realistic."President Daniel Ortega still thinks enforcement of the deal could be stronger. But he says he'll sign it anyway in solidarity with countries most vulnerable to the impact of n…
  4. How Do Poisonous And Venomous Animals Resist Their Own Toxins?

    09.21 / 18:17 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoWhat would happen if a venomous snake bit its tongue? Or if a scorpion stung itself? Lucky for venomous and poisonous animals, they seem to be immune to their own toxins.Some venomous creatures avoid harming themselves because the toxin is in a special compartment in their bodies. For example, certain snakes have glands and ducts lined with cells resistant to the venom.Others have special proteins and enzymes in their blood that prevent toxins from…
  5. Snow Leopards Aren't Endangered Anymore, But They're Still Vulnerable

    09.15 / 03:09 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoSnow leopards have been taken off the International Union for Conservation of Nature's endangered species list.The rare animals only live in 12 countries in Asia, and their new status means they've bounced back from a population below 2,500. Which is great news for the large cat: It's been on the endangered list since 1972. To determine if an animal is endangered or not, the IUCN looks at population size and population trends. If there are fewer than 2,500…
  6. Teen's Invention Aims To Help Those With Food Allergies Safely Eat Out

    09.15 / 03:09 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoAbout 15 million Americans have food allergies. And if you feel like you've heard more and more about food allergies in recent years, you probably have.FAIR Health, a nonprofit that compiles insurance claim data, found the number of health insurance claims that included a diagnosis of anaphylactic food reactions went up 377 percent between 2007 and 2016.Anaphylactic food reactions are when the body has a severe reaction to the antigen, which is the substance it's…
  7. In The US, Minorities Are Exposed To More Air Pollution

    09.15 / 01:12 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoPeople of color are exposed to more air pollution than their white nonHispanic counterparts.Researchers at the University of Washington looked at exposure to nitrogen dioxide, one of the main pollutants produced by cars. It found that race was the most significant influence on rates of exposure — more than income, age or education. These findings are in line with what we know about segregation in U.S. cities. For instance, race tends to determine where s…
  8. Cassini Wasn't Only Great At Science; It Was Also Great At Photos

    09.14 / 23:15 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoThe Cassini spacecraft was a scientific powerhouse. It helped discover six moons and was cited in nearly 4,000 scientific papers.It was also a great photographer. Cassini snapped over 450,000 images during its 20-year voyage.It started with this close-up of Jupiter. Cassini used the planet's gravity to boost itself to Saturn.When it got there, it took some planned artistic shots, like this one of the planet illuminated by the sun. It managed to include our planet in…
  9. Sand Wars: Illegal Mining Is Making One Natural Resource A Lot Rarer

    09.14 / 21:06 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoExtracting and using natural resources has fueled social and political conflict for years, especially when it comes to oil. Now, another resource is gaining attention — sand.Global demand for sand has increased in recent decades. It's a key ingredient in concrete, asphalt, glass and electronics.But that's a problem. Over-extraction of sand can erode ecosystems and habitats. It degrades coral and seaweed, and reduces protection from storm surge on some c…
  10. The Science Of Champagne's 'Pop' Also Can Give Its Vapor An Odd Color

    09.14 / 14:58 newsy.com Newsy.com - Science
    Watch VideoIf you've popped a Champagne cork, you've probably noticed the cloud of white that flows out. But if you're really observant — and the conditions are just right — you might see the cloud turn blue.When the cork is popped, the CO2 inside the bottle expands, and the temperature drops. When the bottle is cold, the drop can form a thick, white cloud.SEE MORE: Why You Should Be Diluting Your WhiskeyBut at warmer temperatures, there's less of a cloud. Instead, CO2 and water vapor in th…