Latest news from O.seattletimes.com - Science feed

Latest news from O.seattletimes.com - Science feed

  1. Archaeologists may have discovered St. Nick’s bones

    10.07 / 05:15 o.seattletimes.com O.seattletimes.com - Science
    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish archaeologists believe they may have discovered the remains of St. Nicholas — from whom the legend of Santa Claus emerged — beneath a church at his birthplace in southern Turkey. St. Nicholas was born and served as a bishop of what is now the Turkish Mediterranean town of Demre, near […]…
  2. Winds, floods and fire: US ties record for costly weather

    10.07 / 05:15 o.seattletimes.com O.seattletimes.com - Science
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Howling winds, deadly floods, fire and ice so far this year have pushed the U.S. into a tie for weather disasters that topped $1 billion in damages. There have been 15 costly disasters through September, tying 2011 for the most billion-dollar weather disasters for the first nine months of a year. The […
  3. Norwegians try to cause landslide in unstable mountain

    10.07 / 05:15 o.seattletimes.com O.seattletimes.com - Science
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Norwegian authorities are trying to provoke a landslide by pumping water onto a mountain where a major shift in the rock has appeared threatening. Lars Harald Blikra of Norway’s Water Resources and Energy Directorate says 75,000 liters (19,500 gallons) of water had been pumped up overnight onto the Mannen mountain, 350 […
  4. In Gaza, Hamas levels an ancient treasure

    10.07 / 05:15 o.seattletimes.com O.seattletimes.com - Science
    TEL ES-SAKAN, Gaza Strip (AP) — Palestinian and French archaeologists began excavating Gaza’s earliest archaeological site nearly 20 years ago, unearthing what they believe is a rare 4,500-year-old Bronze Age settlement. But over protests that grew recently, Gaza’s Hamas rulers have systematically destroyed the work since seizing power a decade ago, allowing the flattening of […
  5. Study: Great white sharks are swimming farther and deeper

    10.07 / 05:15 o.seattletimes.com O.seattletimes.com - Science
    BOSTON (AP) — The movements of great white sharks in the Pacific and Indian oceans have long been the subject of academic study, but new research is just starting to shed light on the behavior of their Atlantic Ocean counterparts. Researchers in Massachusetts say white sharks appear to venture offshore farther, with more frequency and […