Latest news from Phys.org -Science news feed

Latest news from Phys.org -Science news feed

  1. New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

    10.04 / 20:47 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF researcher Yang Yang has come up with a new hybrid nanomaterial that harnesses solar energy and uses it to generate hydrogen from seawater more cheaply and efficiently than current…
  2. Are we at a tipping point with weed control?

    10.04 / 20:47 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Imagine walking the cereal aisle at your favorite grocery store. Are you reading labels? Scanning prices? Thinking about weeds? If you're like most American consumers, weeds probably aren't at the forefront of your mind when buying food. But if farmers could no longer control weeds with existing herbicides, Americans would take notice pretty…
  3. How philosophy can solve your midlife crisis

    10.04 / 19:51 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    A few years ago, a man experienced a midlife crisis. He was professionally successful and had a rewarding family life, but still had a "hollow" feeling. Could he grind away at the same job indefinitely? Would he have to abandon his older hopes and dreams? And wasn't it disheartening to think his life might be halfway…
  4. Researchers 'get rough' with nanomaterials to eliminate problematic stickiness caused by smooth surfaces

    10.04 / 19:51 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The smaller the object, especially at the atomic or subatomic level, the stranger it behaves. For example, as technological devices become smaller and smaller, the even smaller parts are more prone to adhesion or "stickiness." When small-size parts come into contact, they spontaneously stick together and cannot easily be pulled apart. However, recent research at the University of Pittsburgh may "unstick" the problem and improve the next generation of microdevices increasingly used in…
  5. Ancient humans left Africa to escape drying climate

    10.04 / 19:51 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Humans migrated out of Africa as the climate shifted from wet to very dry about 60,000 years ago, according to research led by a University of Arizona…
  6. Officials: GMO mosquitoes aren't 'drugs,' need EPA oversight

    10.04 / 19:51 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials say genetically modified mosquitoes are not "drugs" and should be regulated by environmental…
  7. Discrimination more likely when resources are scarce

    10.04 / 19:51 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    At the height of the Great Recession, psychologist Amy Krosch noticed a troubling trend: people of color seemed to be getting much harder hit than the white population on a number of socioeconomic indicators. She wondered whether something about the psychological effects of economic scarcity might be making pre-recession racial disparities even…
  8. Teleoperating robots with virtual reality

    10.04 / 18:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Many manufacturing jobs require a physical presence to operate machinery. But what if such jobs could be done remotely? This week researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) presented a virtual-reality (VR) system that lets you teleoperate a robot using an Oculus Rift…
  9. NASA satellite finds powerful storms in Tropical Storm Ramon's center

    10.04 / 18:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite looked at Tropical Storm Ramon in infrared light, revealing powerful storms around the center. Ramon formed close to the southwestern coast of Mexico and has already generated a tropical storm…
  10. Nobel-winning technique like "Google Earth for molecules"

    10.04 / 18:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Three researchers won a Nobel Prize on Wednesday for developing a microscope technique that lets scientists see exquisite details of the molecules that drive life—basically providing a front-row seat to study these tiny performers in their biological d…
  11. NASA sees Tropical Depression 16 develop in southwestern Caribbean Sea

    10.04 / 18:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Infrared imagery from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites showed powerful thunderstorms around the center of Tropical Depression 16 as it developed early on Oct. 4 in the southwestern Caribbean…
  12. A win-win for spotted owls and forest management

    10.04 / 18:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Remote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of…
  13. The Latest: Google's new Pixel phones take on Apple

    10.04 / 17:46 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The Latest on Google's new-product showcase (all times…
  14. Battling the forces of darkness: Cybersecurity firm CEO talks Equifax, more

    10.04 / 17:46 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    For millions of Americans, the cybersecurity problem plaguing U.S. businesses just hit home in about the worst way possible. The failure of one business, Equifax, to keep its data secure will lead to a decades-long threat to the finances of more than half the nation's…
  15. That's cool! Flash-frozen pictures reveal molecular world

    10.04 / 17:30 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    A groundbreaking technique awarded the Nobel Chemistry Prize on Wednesday has allowed scientists, using unearthly cold temperatures, to produce exquisitely detailed images of the tiniest structures in…
  16. Fish shrinking as ocean temperatures rise

    10.04 / 17:30 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    One of the most economically important fish is shrinking in body weight, length and overall physical size as ocean temperatures rise, according to new research by LSU Boyd Professor R. Eugene Turner published today. The average body size of Menhaden—a small, silver fish—caught off the coasts from Maine to Texas—has shrunk by about 15 percent over the past 65 years…
  17. Federal government: No threatened species listing for walrus

    10.04 / 17:30 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The Trump administration announced Wednesday it will not list the Pacific walrus as a threatened species based on diminished Arctic Ocean sea ice, concluding that the marine mammals have adapted to the…
  18. Google unveils $49 Home Mini digital assistant

    10.04 / 17:01 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Google on Wednesday unveiled a slimmed down version of its digital assistant connected speaker starting at $49, stepping up its challenge to market leader…
  19. Foxconn will locate plant in southeastern Wisconsin complex

    10.04 / 17:01 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Local political leaders say Taiwanese technology manufacturer Foxconn will locate its new sprawling manufacturing complex in southeastern…
  20. Surface helium detonation spells end for white dwarf

    10.04 / 17:01 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    An international team of researchers has found evidence that the brightest stellar explosions in our Universe could be triggered by helium nuclear detonation near the surface of a white dwarf star. Using Hyper Suprime-Cam mounted on the Subaru Telescope, the team detected a type Ia supernova within a day after the explosion, and explained its behavior through a model calculated using the supercomputer ATERUI. This result was reported in Nature published on Oct.…