Latest news from Phys.org -Science news feed

Latest news from Phys.org -Science news feed

  1. Class pervades the way migrants are viewed in Britain

    03.28 / 13:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    In a poll of 25 countries by Ipsos MORI published in March 2017, 33% of those interviewed in Britain said immigration was their biggest worry. Although more British people overall were worried about healthcare, only Germans were more worried about…
  2. More compulsory math lessons do not encourage women to pursue STEM careers

    03.28 / 13:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The demand for employees in STEM careers (science, technology, engineering and math) is particularly high, as corporations compete to attract skilled professionals in the international market. What is known as "curriculum intensification" is often used around the world to attract more university entrants – and particularly more women – to these subjects; that is to say, students have on average more mandatory math courses at a higher level. Scientists from the LEAD Graduate School and Res…
  3. Scientist maps giant virus

    03.28 / 13:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    In a laboratory at Michigan State University, scientists took a DIY approach to build a retrofitted cryo-electron microscope that allowed them to map a giant Samba virus – one of the world's largest v…
  4. Virtual museum brings extinct species back to life

    03.28 / 13:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Dozens of fascinating digital 3-D models are shedding new light on specimens held at the University of Dundee's D'Arcy Thompson Museum while enhancing the learning of anatomy students around the…
  5. Countering fake news with contagions

    03.28 / 13:39 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Social media is a wonderful tool for sharing information quickly; But not surprisingly, some of that information is false and has played a role in the dissemination of conspiracy theories and fake…
  6. Changing habitat releasing long-stored carbon into the atmosphere

    03.28 / 12:12 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Coastal environments supporting seagrasses, salt marshes and mangroves are storehouses for vast reserves of organic carbon known as blue carbon. These reservoirs have trapped organic carbon beneath the surface for hundreds to thousands of years in a low oxygen…
  7. Can computers one day understand emotions? New patent paves the way

    03.28 / 12:12 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    A new patent awarded to a Penn State team led by James Wang, professor in the College of Information Sciences and Technology; Reginald Adams, associate professor of psychology in the College of the Liberal Arts; Jia Li, professor of statistics in the Eberly College of Science; and Michelle Newman, professor of psychology, takes the next step in computer learning techniques in the hopes that computers can one day understand the complex realm of human…
  8. Words matter when math teachers describe student learning

    03.28 / 12:12 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Think back to math class in elementary school. Do you remember being assigned to a "high," "middle" or "low" group? If so, you'll relate to a new study from North Carolina State University on the importance of how teachers talk about students' mathematical…
  9. The world's first international race for molecular cars, the Nanocar Race

    03.24 / 10:05 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Nanocars will compete for the first time ever during an international molecule-car race on April 28-29, 2017 in Toulouse (south-western France). The vehicles, which consist of a few hundred atoms, will be powered by minute electrical pulses during the 36 hours of the race, in which they must navigate a racecourse made of gold atoms, and measuring a maximum of a 100 nanometers in length. They will square off beneath the four tips of a unique microscope located at the CNRS's Centre…
  10. Inventing a new kind of matter

    03.24 / 10:05 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Imagine a liquid that could move on its own. No need for human effort or the pull of gravity. You could put it in a container flat on a table, not touch it in any way, and it would still…
  11. Kaikoura quake may prompt rethink of earthquake hazard models internationally

    03.24 / 10:05 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Last November's magnitude 7.8 Kaikoura earthquake was so complex and unusual that it is likely to lead to changes in the way scientists think about earthquake hazards in plate boundary zones worldwide, a new study…
  12. Heavy metal binding domain in a cysteine-rich protein may be sea snail adaptation to metal stress

    03.24 / 10:05 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    A special type of small sulfur-rich protein, metallothioneins, have an extraordinary capability for binding heavy metals. An international team of scientists has now discovered that the marine common periwinkle, which is widely considered a delicacy, contains the largest version of the protein found yet, with one additional cadmium-binding domain and a one-third higher detoxification capacity. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this feature may help the snail survive in…
  13. The development of amphibians and reptiles through twelve million years of geological history

    03.24 / 10:05 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientist Professor Dr. Madelaine Böhme studied the development of the amphibian and reptile fauna in Western Siberia during the past twelve million years. In their study, published today in the scientific journal Peer J, the scientists demonstrate that the species diversity of both groups of animals was noticeably higher in the past than it is today. Among others, for the first time the researchers discovered an Asiatic representative of …
  14. California fuel standards to get critical review

    03.24 / 08:57 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    A state review has found California is on track to meet its tougher car-emission standards and urges regulators to draft more ambitious environmental targets for the…
  15. Another reason to flip the off switch: light pollution

    03.24 / 07:52 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    For the 11th year running, cities worldwide will turn their lights off Saturday to mark Earth Hour in a global call to action on climate…
  16. Spacewalking French, US astronauts to upgrade orbiting lab

    03.24 / 06:48 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    A French and an American astronaut are scheduled to float outside the International Space Station Friday for a spacewalk aimed at upgrading the orbiting outpost for the arrival of future space…
  17. Japan culls 280,000 more birds for avian flu

    03.24 / 06:48 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Japan deployed hundreds of soldiers to help cull more than 280,000 chickens on Friday, officials said as they try to contain further outbreaks of a highly contagious strain of avian…
  18. A round-trip flight just for the view—the Southern Lights

    03.24 / 06:48 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    They took an eight-hour flight just to look out the airplane's window, but it was an extraordinary…
  19. Google ad boycott could aim ire at ad-serving software

    03.24 / 06:48 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Google's money-making foundation is strong enough to endure a current boycott by advertisers, but the movement could rattle the practice of software "programmed" ad placement, analysts said on…
  20. New tools to spy on raiding baboons in suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa

    03.24 / 06:48 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Scientists from Swansea University's College of Science are part of an international team attempting to better understand the human-baboon conflict in Cape Town, South…