Latest news from Phys.org -Science news feed

Latest news from Phys.org -Science news feed

  1. Blacks experience more family member deaths than whites, on average: study

    01.23 / 20:26 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    African-Americans are more likely than whites to experience the loss of a parent during childhood and more likely to be exposed to multiple family member deaths by mid-life, according to a study by the Population Research Center at The University of Texas at…
  2. New research on wine fermentation could lead to better bouquet

    01.23 / 18:35 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The taste of wine arises from a symphony of compounds that are assembled as yeast ferment the must from grapes. But much of what happens in this process remains obscure. Now a team of researchers from France, a country that is synonymous with good wine, has begun to unveil the outlines of how yeast manage nitrogen, an essential element that comprises about 16 percent of proteins, and four percent of all organic matter. The research is published January 23rd in Applied and Environmental…
  3. How do people choose what plants to use?

    01.23 / 17:59 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    There are about 400,000 species of plants in the world. Humans use approximately 10-15% of them to cover our basic needs, such as food, medicine and shelter, as well as other needs, such as recreation, art, and craft. But why and how have humans selected only a small fraction of all plants to utilize? A new study published in today's Nature Plants sheds new light on these questions by investigating how people use palms in South America. The overall conclusion is that people are very…
  4. Crop achilles' heel costs farmers 10 percent of potential yield

    01.23 / 17:58 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Scientists assumed leaves at the top of a plant would be the best at turning higher levels of light into carbohydrates—through the process of photosynthesis—while the lower shaded leaves would be better at processing the low light levels that penetrate the plant's canopy of leaves. Turns out that in two of our most productive crops, these shaded leaves are less efficient than the top leaves, limiting yie…
  5. Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

    01.23 / 17:21 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), CIEMAT (Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research), Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, in collaboration with the firm BioDan Group, have presented a prototype for a 3-D bioprinter that can create totally functional human skin. This skin is adequate for transplanting to patients or for use in research or the testing of cosmetic, chemical, and pharmaceutical p…
  6. Video: What might Trump mean for chemistry?

    01.23 / 16:08 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Donald Trump is now the 45th president of the U.S. While much was said about a variety of topics during the presidential campaign, little was said about science. This leaves uncertainty around how the new administration will deal with science and how its approach will impact chemistry, research funding, trade policy and…
  7. Peruvian potatoes to join world's largest banana collection in Belgium

    01.23 / 15:31 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    For 30 years, KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium) has been home to an impressive collection of bananas that already contains over 1,500 varieties and is the biggest in its kind. The collection is recognised as world heritage and will soon be expanded with another food crop: 8,000 potato varieties of the International Potato Centre in Peru are coming to…
  8. Amid angst, tech industry innovates

    01.23 / 14:54 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    CES is nearly a week-long party celebrating the tech industry. But in recent years, the annual tech show, held earlier this month, has had a palpable sense of anxiety as much as…
  9. How plant cells regulate growth shown for the first time

    01.23 / 13:43 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Researchers have managed to show how the cells in a plant, a multicellular organism, determine their size and regulate their growth over time. The findings overturn previous theories in the field and are potentially significant for the future of agriculture and forestry - as it reveals more about one of the factors which determine the size of plants and…
  10. Camera able to capture imagery of an optical Mach cone

    01.23 / 13:42 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis has built a camera apparatus capable of capturing moving imagery of an optical Mach cone. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes their image capturing system and other possible applications of the t…
  11. Professors reflect on the issue of climate change in Trump's administration

    01.23 / 13:41 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    ManMohan Sodhi, Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management commented on climate change and how the rise of natural disasters could impact the US…
  12. Your Android device's Pattern Lock can be cracked within five attempts

    01.23 / 13:04 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The popular Pattern Lock system used to secure millions of Android phones can be cracked within just five attempts – and more complicated patterns are the easiest to crack, security experts r…
  13. Scientists develop micromotors that neutralize gastric acid and release drugs depending on pH

    01.23 / 12:28 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Tiny "submarines" that speed independently through the stomach, use gastric acid for fuel (while rapidly neutralizing it), and release their cargo precisely at the desired pH: Though it may sound like science fiction, this is a new method for treating stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs introduced by scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The technique is based on proton-driven micromotors with a pH-dependent polymer coating that can be loaded with…
  14. As Trump takes office, there appears to be little hope of bringing people together, VCU political scientist says

    01.23 / 11:53 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    As Donald Trump is sworn in today at noon as the 45th president of the United States, Virginia Commonwealth University political science professor Deirdre Condit, Ph.D., says the country remains deeply divided, and she is skeptical the divisions will be healed anytime soon…
  15. How can high-energy physics help the water shortage?

    01.23 / 11:52 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    It might be hard to imagine what link there could be between a huge scientific machine underneath Geneva and a field of tomatoes in Lebanon but both need advanced technology to achieve their best results. Even if they seem light years apart, they face the same technical…
  16. Shape-shifting nucleosomes open new avenues for epigenetics research

    01.23 / 11:51 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The textbook description of chromatin, the condensed form DNA takes when it is not in use, consists of rigid building-blocks called nucleosomes, which act as spindles on which inactive DNA can be spooled and archived. But a new UCSF study promises to overturn this understanding, demonstrating that nucleosomes actively change their shape as part of the larger process of epigenetic regulation of gene…
  17. Mummy visualisation impresses in computer journal

    01.23 / 11:50 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Using visualisation technology developed at Linköping University under the auspices of Visualization Center C, visitors to the British Museum can reveal the murder of the mummified Geberlein Man, 5,500 years ago. This world-leading technology has been described in a prestigious journal of computer science, Communications of the …
  18. Melting solid below the freezing point

    01.23 / 10:36 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    Phase transitions surround us—for instance, liquid water changes to ice when frozen and to steam when boiled. Now, researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science have discovered a new phenomenon of so-called metastability in a liquid phase. A metastable liquid is not quite stable. This state is common in supercooled liquids, which are liquids that cool below the freezing point without turning into a solid or a crystal. Now, scientists report the first experimental evidence of creating …
  19. Samsung blames Galaxy Note 7 fires on faulty batteries

    01.23 / 07:32 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The world's biggest smartphone maker Samsung blamed faulty batteries on Monday for the fires that hit its flagship Galaxy Note 7 device last year, as it sought to draw a line under the humiliating…
  20. Taiwan's Foxconn chief confirms mulling $7 bn US investment

    01.22 / 18:04 phys.org Phys.org -Science news
    The head of Taiwan's tech giant Foxconn confirmed Sunday he is considering a $7 billion investment to make TV flat panels in the United States in a joint project with Japan's…