Latest news from Popular Science - News feed

Latest news from Popular Science - News feed

  1. Moth gut bacteria could help create new antibiotics

    01.19 / 19:59 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health This benevolent bacteria fends off deadly microbial invaders A recent study suggests that a bacteria in a moth's gut secretes a toxic substance that kills off other invading, and often deadly,…
  2. This machine lets your smartphone analyze DNA

    01.19 / 17:32 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health There's an app for that? This $500 device enables a smartphone to identify DNA…
  3. Why are scientists so obsessed with studying zombies?

    01.11 / 19:50 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science Just because zombies aren’t real doesn’t mean we can’t learn from them Zombies can help us understand how infectious diseases spread, teach us about math or neuroscience, and improve our efforts to prepare for real crise…
  4. This super-cheap paper centrifuge can spin 125,000 times per minute

    01.10 / 19:57 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health The hand-powered device could help detect malaria A paper centrifuge powered only by human hands could perform super-cheap blood…
  5. Certain kinds of vaginal bacteria can actually boost HIV risk

    01.10 / 17:30 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health The balance of microbes can change your susceptibility Certain bacteria that dwell in the vagina can make a woman more vulnerable to…
  6. 6 body parts that hid from science in plain sight

    01.06 / 21:27 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health The newly "discovered" mesentery isn't the only wily organ From the brain to the genitals, our bodies host bits that have remained hidden or misunderstood for much of…
  7. Endless black holes, ice domes on Mars, and other top images of the week

    01.06 / 19:01 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science Newsworthy eye candy Our favorite images from this week in science, health, and technology…
  8. A stomach grown in a petri dish could help scientists understand our guts

    01.04 / 20:15 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health Digestion under a microscope Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital created a working piece of human stomach in a lab, complete with acid and digestive-enzyme producing c…
  9. This is your brain on drugs

    01.02 / 14:15 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health Brain scans and other studies reveal how drugs hijack your brain What drugs are doing inside your…
  10. Can I use moss to navigate?

    12.30 / 13:25 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science Short answer: In principal, yes Common wisdom says that moss grows only on the north side of trees, which means you can use it to find your bearings if you’re lost in the woods. This is generally t…
  11. How to survive a polar bear plunge (and why you shouldn't do one)

    12.29 / 15:33 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health Wading in makes it a little safer This seems like a dumb idea: In the middle of winter, strip down into your bathing suit and take a running leap into the ice-cold, freezing ocean water. Yet every…
  12. These two-headed worms could help scientists regrow lost limbs

    12.28 / 14:40 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health Two heads really are better than one Geneticist Michael Levin at Tufts University is hopeful that his work will someday allow us to grow back our lost…
  13. Charting the volcanic eruptions that are pushing our world apart

    12.23 / 17:01 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science At the bottom of the sea, Colin Devey studies how our continents move away (and toward) each other. Colin Devey has spent his career investigating the undersea volcanoes that push our world apart. Read…
  14. Breaking the glass ceiling on the ocean floor

    12.23 / 16:25 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science Cindy Lee Van Dover was the first woman to pilot the Alvin submarine, and that was only the beginning. Cindy Lee Van Dover was the first woman to pilot the Alvin submarine, and that was only the beginning of a prestigious…
  15. Trump’s pick for the Office of Management and Budget questions why the government funds science

    12.22 / 15:30 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science Holding the purse strings The Office of Managment and Budget might seem like a less prominent position than, for example, the head of the EPA or the Department of Energy, but it’s a v…
  16. We’ve been grinding up plants to eat for over 10,000 years

    12.21 / 19:29 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science Early humans loved them some leaves If you had to eat a ficus you’d grind it up t…
  17. How to work out at your parents’ house this holiday season

    12.21 / 04:19 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health The most scientifically effective exercises you can do with a Christmas ham During the holidays, it’s smart to squeeze in a workout or two between the hearty meals, endless cookies, free-flowing booze, and egg nog. We devised four workouts t…
  18. Antimatter just got a little bit less mysterious

    12.19 / 16:29 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science Scientists hit a new milestone for antihydrogen Researchers at CERN's ALPHA experiment have made the first measurements of antihydrogen’s internal s…
  19. Pregnancy actually re-wires your brain

    12.19 / 16:29 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Health The structure changes could help with mom-baby bonding Becoming a parent is a life-altering experience. It's also a brain-altering experience, according to new…
  20. Strange giant diamonds give hints to the inner Earth's composition

    12.16 / 15:45 popsci.com Popular Science - News
    Science It’s a song of iron and ‘ice’. The largest diamonds ever mined on earth aren’t just set apart by their large size and luster, but also by a unique origin story. They were born of metal, growing from……