Latest news from Npr.org - Arts feed

Latest news from Npr.org - Arts feed

  1. How Do Pheromones Really Work?

    01.19 / 23:41 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Pheromones are mysterious compounds that can make a mammal smell more sexy--but that's not true for humans. Zoologist Tristram Wyatt says human pheremones are hard to…
  2. In 'Staying Vertical,' A Writer Gets Drawn Into The Sexual Life Of A Small Village

    01.19 / 22:28 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    The latest film by writer/director Alain Guiraudie (Stranger by the Lake) is a brutally frank meditation on polymorphous carnality in rural southern…
  3. Rest Your Greatness: Six Key Moments With DJ Khaled

    01.17 / 15:20 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    NPR's David Greene recently spoke with producer-musician-Snapchatter DJ Khaled about his jet ski adventure, his love of pillows, and all the things "they" don't want you to…
  4. A Century-Old Poet Looks Back — And Fearlessly Forward — In 'Purgatory'

    01.14 / 13:17 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Henry Morgenthau III had a long and eventful life even before he started writing poetry in his 90s. Now, at age 100, he's promoting his first poetry collection, called A Sunday in…
  5. In 'Cold Eye,' A Small Story That Packs A Big Punch

    01.14 / 12:04 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    The second installment of Laura Anne Gilman's gritty, mythmaking Devil's West series follows Isobel, the Devil's Left Hand, as she learns the extent of her powers and battles an ancient, angry…
  6. Ring In 'Lemony Snicket' On Netflix With A Series Of Unfortunate Recipes

    01.13 / 11:36 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    In the children's books, food is practically a supporting character. So why not welcome the poor Baudelaire orphans with a delightfully miserable repast while binge-watching the new…
  7. Fulfill Your Reading Resolutions With 6 Books From Librarian Nancy Pearl

    01.12 / 09:55 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Every once in a while, NPR's go-to books guru sends host Steve Inskeep a big stack of books. They're generally "under-the-radar" reads — titles she thinks deserve a little more a…
  8. Immigration And Infertility Bring Two Mothers Together Over One 'Lucky Boy'

    01.10 / 21:48 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Shanthi Sekaran's new novel tells the story of a Mexican woman who has entered the U.S. without papers and an Indian-American chef struggling to have a…
  9. What Is Driving The 'Unbanking Of America'?

    01.10 / 18:45 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Author Lisa Servon says a growing number of Americans are giving up on traditional banks and relying instead on alternatives, including prepaid debit cards, check-cashing centers and payday…
  10. Actress Octavia Spencer Says 'Hidden Figures' Is A Movie Anyone Can Get Behind

    01.08 / 23:25 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    NPR's Michel Martin talks with Octavia Spencer about her latest film, Hidden Figures. It tells the story of the black, female mathematicians who helped launch the first American astronauts into…
  11. Actress Sigourney Weaver Talks About Redefining The Leading Lady Role

    01.08 / 23:24 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Weaver talks about her new film, A Monster Calls, which tells the story of an adolescent boy who seeks solace in his imagination from the sadness and anger of losing his mother to a terminal…
  12. When The TV Industry Doesn't Reflect Its Audience, Critics Ask The Tough Questions

    01.08 / 13:41 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Variety's Maureen Ryan has been critical of how rape is portrayed on TV. She says writers' rooms should reflect its diverse audience — especially when it comes to approach such sensitive t…
  13. A Memoir Of Taking Christianity 'To The Extreme'

    01.07 / 13:19 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Comedy writer Maggie Rowe was 19 when she checked herself into an evangelical psychiatric facility. She says she had a fear of sin and eternal damnation. That's the focus of her memoir Sin…
  14. Psychic Soldiers Populate 'Throwaways' — With Style

    01.07 / 12:06 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Caitlin Kittredge's comic series about psychic soldiers on the run from government experiments is brisk, colorful fun, complemented by Steve Sanders' stylish character designs and deft…
  15. 'Paterson' Paints A Delicate Portrait Of A Bus Driver Who Writes Poetry

    01.06 / 19:40 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    Jim Jarmusch's new film, Paterson, was loosely inspired by William Carlos Williams' epic poem of the same name. Critic David Edelstein says the film expertly evokes the inner state of an…
  16. Titanic Documentary Suggests Engine Room Fire Led To Sinking

    01.05 / 13:21 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Senan Molony about his documentary, which presents evidence that a fire in the engine room could have also led to the sinking of the ship and the loss of 1,500…
  17. Returning To A Beloved Series In 'The Heart Of What Was Lost'

    01.05 / 12:08 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    It's been 23 years since Tad Williams wrapped up his epic Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series. Now, he returns to the land of Osten Ard in a brief gem of a story that sets up a fresh epic to…
  18. To Appeal To A Modern Palate, Native Chef Gives Tradition A Little Twist

    01.01 / 13:59 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    More Native Americans are revisiting indigenous ingredients and methods of cooking. It's a natural calling for chefs, like Navajo Freddie Bitsoie, who have found themselves in a cultural tug of…
  19. 'Midnight Without A Moon' Fictionalizes Civil Rights Moment Through The Eyes Of A 13-Year-Old

    01.01 / 13:58 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    One of the most tragic moments in civil rights history, the murder of Emmett Till, unfolds from the perspective of a young girl in Linda Williams Jackson's new YA novel. She talks to NPR's Ailsa…
  20. Women Who Count: 3 Smart STEM Romances

    01.01 / 12:10 npr.org Npr.org - Arts
    A new wave of romance novels features brainy heroines in science, technology, engineering and math — and the prejudices and obstacles they face on their way to a satisfying h…